Fraternal Twins

In the spring of 2015, I built a piece that would fit generally into the furniture category of "occasional table."  It is really not a very descriptive title, but refers to, essentially, a table that one might find in a living room, as a place holder for a lamp, artwork, or perhaps everyday items such as a book or newspaper.

In this case, the table itself is the artwork, and holds two "opposite" point of interest - the outside, and the inside.  The title of the piece is the "Balanced Helix."  I am pleased to say that I have built and sold five of these.  Two reside in the Twin Cities area, one near Madison, Wisconsin, one near Washington, D.C., and one in Switzerland.  Four of the five have been built from African mahogany and ebonized African mahogany, while one was built using hard maple and cherry.

This past fall, I decided to build another two, but in contrasting architectural styles, using jatoba and ebonized maple.  Each has twenty-two levels of "frames," and while the configuration of one is in the rotational helix format, the other is all set at 90º angles, showing a Mayan influence.  Save for the fact that they are in "opposite" configurations, they are the same - thus the designation, "Fraternal Twins."

 

The Fraternal Twins:  To the left is the "Balanced Helix, to the right is the "Mayan Pedestal."

The Fraternal Twins:  To the left is the "Balanced Helix, to the right is the "Mayan Pedestal."

Here is a view of the internal structure of the twins, viewed through 1/4" plate glass.

Here is a view of the internal structure of the twins, viewed through 1/4" plate glass.